5 + 1 CS Lewis Books on my TBR/Re-Read

Hullo, world!

It’s a beautiful Saturday morning–a quiet, peaceful sort that reminds me of what Christ has done for us. I actually debated whether or not to write a blog post this week because it feels…a bit sacrilegious…then again, I realised it’s a good time to reflect a bit on the more theological-heavy readings I like to do!

*proceeds to haul out my stack of the CS Lewis library*

So I present to you, the 5 + 1 (shorter) CS Lewis books on my TBR/Re-Read shelf!

1. Miracles

‘The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this.’

This is the key statement of ‘Miracles’, in which C. S. Lewis shows that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in his creation.

Using his characteristic lucidity and wit to develop his argument, Lewis challenges the rationalists, agnostics and deists on their own grounds and provides a poetic and joyous affirmation that miracles really do occur in our everyday lives.

I’ve read this book before, but I don’t remember much about it, only that it was (as usual) a really good book on miracles! So, it’s probably a good time to re-read it & make sure the thing stays in my head…(´∩ω∩`)

2. Reflections on the Psalms

Lewis writes here about the difficulties he has met or the joys he has gained in reading the Psalms. He points out that the Psalms are poems, intended to be sung, not doctrinal treatises or sermons. Proceeding with his characteristic grace, he guides readers through both the form and the meaning of these beloved passages in the Bible.

This book has been on my TBR for a long time…and now that I’m trying to memorise the Psalms, I think it’s worthwhile the read. 

Also, I must confess that I’ve avoided reading/thinking about Psalms for the longest time–I don’t hate it, but I had difficulties with it despite the number of times I’ve gone through it. I’m hoping this book and memorisation will cure me of this. ( ´•௰•`)

3. A Grief Observed

Written in longhand in notebooks that Lewis found in his home, A Grief Observed probes the “mad midnight moments” of Lewis’s mourning and loss, moments in which he questioned what he had previously believed about life and death, marriage, and even God. Indecision and self-pity assailed Lewis. “We are under the harrow and can’t escape,” he writes. “I know that the thing I want is exactly the thing I can never get. The old life, the jokes, the drinks, the arguments, the lovemaking, the tiny, heartbreaking commonplace.” Writing A Grief Observed as “a defense against total collapse, a safety valve,” he came to recognize that “bereavement is a universal and integral part of our experience of love.”

Lewis writes his statement of faith with precision, humor, and grace. Yet neither is Lewis reluctant to confess his continuing doubts and his awareness of his own human frailty. This is precisely the quality which suggests that A Grief Observed may become “among the great devotional books of our age.”

I feel like since most of the CS Lewis books are perpetually on my TBR/Re-Read shelf, my comments will start sounding the same– “it’s been on my TBR shelf, so I MUST read it!”

But for this book specifically, I have a vested interest even though I haven’t technically lost anyone close to me, my grandmother (in Japan) has been ill for a while now and it’s tough to be far away, knowing she can pass away any time without knowing the salvation found in Jesus. 

4. Till We Have Faces

In this timeless tale of two mortal princesses- one beautiful and one unattractive- C.S. Lewis reworks the classical myth of Cupid and Psyche into an enduring piece of contemporary fiction. This is the story of Orual, Psyche’s embittered and ugly older sister, who possessively and harmfully loves Psyche. Much to Orual’s frustration, Psyche is loved by Cupid, the god of love himself, setting the troubled Orual on a path of moral development.

Set against the backdrop of Glome, a barbaric, pre-Christian world, the struggles between sacred and profane love are illuminated as Orual learns that we cannot understand the intent of the gods “till we have faces” and sincerity in our souls and selves. 

I’ve read this book around three times now, and with every re-read, it becomes even deeper. I only own this as an eBook, so I’m seriously considering buying it so I can annotate it…٩(´꒳`)۶

5. The Weight of Glory

The classic Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis, the most important Christian writer of the 20th century, contains nine sermons delivered by Lewis during World War Two. The nine addresses in Weight of Glory offer guidance, inspiration, and a compassionate apologetic for the Christian faith during a time of great doubt.

I’ve started reading this and school overwhelmed me, so I haven’t finished it. I think this book will be really relevant to me esp. given the politically charged atmosphere of Canada & the world these days. 

6. The Problem of Pain

For centuries Christians have questioned why, if God is good and all-powerful, he allows us to suffer pain. C.S. Lewis sets out to disentangle this knotty issue, but adds that, in the end, no intellectual solution can avoid the need for faith.

My brother bought this on our latest used-bookstore haul (you might remember it from two months ago) and he’s been telling me how good it is. (Although the point is kind of moot by now since we all agree that all CS Lewis books are THE classics.) So, as soon as he finishes it, I’ll probably beg him to lend it to me. (   ¯꒳¯ )b✧

And that sums up today for now!

Thank you for reading! How is your holy week going? Do you have any CS Lewis TBR/re-reads? What are some of your favourite CS Lewis books? (Or, a book you keep coming back to?) Let me know in the comments below; I’d love to chat with you!

6 thoughts on “5 + 1 CS Lewis Books on my TBR/Re-Read

  1. I really enjoyed reading through this list. I have to admit that the only C.S. Lewis books that I have read are the Narnia books, but (!!) I have been wanting to read his other work for a while now. “Till We Have Faces” is currently waiting for me on the bookshelf by my desk. 🙂

    My Holy Week went really well and now I am simply trying to come to terms with the fact that Lent is actually over – it seemed to fly by for us.
    How was your Holy Week?

    Liked by 1 person

    • My Holy Week went well! And yes, I can’t believe it’s over already…(it’ll soon be Pentecost??)

      C.S. Lewis books are awesome. If you’ve read Narnia, TWHF is a good place to start! It’s not like Narnia, but it’s closer in origins I think because of the mythical elements Lewis draws from 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ooh, I read Reflections on the Psalms so long ago, and I’d forgotten it existed! I might have to reread it, too…I remember it being excellent.

    A Grief Observed is excellent, but I’d highly recommend reading it *before* someone close to you dies. It’s just…really hard, even without having experienced that kind of loss, and I can’t imagine trying to read it *while* grieving.

    Till We Have Faces really does get deeper with each reread! I just reread it, and it’s so perpetually wonderful, beautiful, and insightful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I will definitely read AGO before something drastic like that happens….(hopes it won’t happen any time soon…) 。°(´∩ω∩`)°。
      And now I really want to go re-read TWHF for the nth time!! ٩(´꒳`)۶

      Like

  3. I’m realizing now that I have barely read anything by C.S. Lewis and I need to remedy that! These all sound SO good and they’ve been on my radar for awhile but I really think I need to bump them up higher on my TBR.
    Thanks for sharing your list, SJ!
    .
    (P.S. also can I just say that I love all the gifs you always add to your posts. they add such a beautiful, calming aesthetic to your blog and I LOVE THEM SO MUCH. ❤️)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for reading! And any C. S. Lewis book is worth the read. *me once again advertising for Lewis, shamelessly at that*

      And thank YOU so much for loving the gifs! I love gifs & they’re one of the favourite parts of writing a blog post 🥰 )

      Liked by 1 person

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